Monthly Archives: May 2013

How to tell you’re a nerd: Method 249 (or Don Cheadle is Captain Planet)


You’re childhood enjoyment of the Captain Planet cartoon series lends itself to a surprising appreciation for the four-part Funny or Die comedic saga in which Don Cheadle portrays a rather insane Captain Planet. 

Click on the links below to behold, what I like to call, The Downfall of Captain Planet

Part I

Part II

Part III

Part IV

How to tell you’re a nerd: Method 248 (or “You’ve got red on you…”)


A group of people you don’t know are conversing nearby, as you exit a building.  You clearly overhear the phrase “lamb’s blood.”  Though you are a bit alarmed at this phrase, and have no idea of the actual context of the conversation, part of you would find it amusing to approach them and interject the following:

“Excuse me, but you aren’t planning on killing a djinn by chance, are you?  I only ask because in order to destroy that particular supernatural creature, the lamb’s blood needs to already be on the dagger or it won’t work.  Also, it’s a good idea to have backup on hand as the touch of a djinn can render you incapacitated via psychic attack as it feeds off of your life-force.”

How to tell you’re a nerd: Method 247 (or “I am Michael Bay, and I believe in fitness…”)


You have concluded that the following is the best way to describe the brilliant, twisted, comedic weirdness that is Michael Bay’s new film, Pain & Gain:

The film has the same sensibilities as the movie Step Brothers, if (a) the brothers had decided to become criminal “masterminds” rather that start a marketing company, and (b) it was based on a true story.

The characters’ behavior in both films are equally illogical and wickedly funny, except that if one of the characters from Pain & Gain told you, “Don’t touch my drumset,” it would be wise not to test them, lest you be wearing said drumset as a hat due to possible “‘roid’ rage”.

Danny Boyle’s PSA on the “Pixarification” of movies


Having recently discovered this interview segment with Oscar-winning director Danny Boyle, on the “Pixarification” of today’s film industry (by which he means a trend toward appealing to “family friendly” audiences at the expense of the visceral, thought-provoking, grown-up movies of the 1970s). I thought I’d share his thoughts with you, my avid readers.  What are your thoughts on the points sai Boyle brings up?  Does his new film, Trance, meet his intended goals?